Podziel się!Share on Facebook0Pin on Pinterest0Tweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+0Print this pageEmail this to someone

Zdjęcia i film (driving pain) przygotowane przez organizacje Animal Protection Institute (API) oraz Compassion in World Farming. Sprawa dotyczy transportów zwierząt ze Stanów do Meksyku gdzie zwierzeta są zabijane a następnie ich mięso przewożone do USA (chodzi o opłacalność i inne przepisy).

Zwierzęta podczas transportu łamią nogi, depczą się, duszą, przez 30 godzin podróżują w gorącu, przepełnieniu, bez wody czy pożywienia. Więcej info po angielsku, poniżej.

Tekst i zdjęcia: www.api4animals.org/a6a5_transport.php
Film: www.api4animals.org/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/driving-pain.wmv

1. TRANSPORT TRAUMAS
—————————-

Animals at auction suffering from broken legs, infected eyes, foaming mouths and sores, forced to travel more than 30 hours in hot, overcrowded conditions without food, water or rest. These were among the findings of a just-released investigation by the Animal Protection Institute (API) and Compassion in World Farming that documents the transport of cows in the U.S. and pigs from the U.S. to slaughterhouses in Mexico. Dead and dying animals were also filmed at the auctions. API Chief Executive Michelle Thew said: „Farmed animals are typically moved several times during their lives…. Our investigation demonstrates that government action is urgently needed to regulate the transport of farmed animals and set a maximum journey time of eight hours.” The organizations are also calling on consumers and retailers to help. The report, entitled „Driving Pain,” along with video and photos, can be viewed at: http://tinyurl.com/lekep

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency may amend the section of the Health of Animals Act that covers the transport of farmed animals in order to reflect changes that have occurred since the law’s introduction 30 years ago. The Albert Farm Animal Care Association is urging the Agency to be flexible in regards to evolving industry practices and standards.

In the U.S., PETA is seeking legal action against Smithfield Foods for failing to promptly treat and/or euthanize pigs suffering from accidents involving the company’s trucks. Smithfield counters that it has a policy of responding as quickly as possible and euthanizing pigs as soon as they are identified as severely injured.

AFAC Calls for Flexible Animal Transport Regulations
Farmscape, Susan Church Bruce Cochrane, June 1, 2006
http://tinyurl.com/ldz28

Actor from ‚Babe’ Supports PETA’S Cruelty Concerns
Daily Press, Patrick Lynch, June 6, 2006
http://tinyurl.com/l6l59

Źródło: FARMED ANIMAL WATCH
www.FarmedAnimal.net
June 9, 2006 Number 20, Volume 6

Nadesłał/a: zwierzetamajaprawa